Archivo de la etiqueta: cursos de inglés en Noia

White Winter Melodies

Bob Dylan – Girl of the North Country (1962)

Video:

Lyrics:

If you’re traveling in the north country fair
Where the winds hit heavy on the borderline
Remember me to one who lives there
For she was once a true love of mine.

Well, if you go when the snowflakes storm
When the rivers freeze and summer ends
Please see for me if she’s wearing a coat so warm
To keep her from the howlin’ winds.

Please see from me if her hair hanging down
If it curls and flows all down her breast
Please see from me if her hair hanging down
That’s the way I remember her best.

Well, if you’re traveling in the north country fair
Where the winds hit heavy on the borderline
Please say hello to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine.

If you’re travelin’ in the north country fair
Where the winds hit heavy on the borderline
Remember me to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine.

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bobdylan/girlfromthenorthcountry.html

Sonny Boy Williamson – Nine Below Zero (1963)

Video:

http://www.eyeneer.com/video/blues/sonny-boy-williamson/nine-below-zero

Lyrics:

Yeah, ain’t that a pity, people ain’t that a cryin’ shame
Ain’t that a pity, I declare it’s a cryin’ shame
She wait till it got nine below zero, and put me down for another man
I give her all my money, all of my lovin’ and everything
All of my money, all of my lovin’ and everything
It done got nine below zero and she done put me down for another man
Nine below zero, the little girl she done put me down
Nine below zero, the little girl she done put me down
She know I don’t have nowhere to stay, and I don’t have not one dime

Source:

http://www.lyricsmania.com/nine_below_zero_lyrics_sonny_boy_williamson.html

Vashti Bunyan – Winter is blue (1965)

Video:

Lyrics:

Winter is blue
Living is gone
Some are just sleeping
In spring they’ll go on

Our love is dead
Nothing but crying
Love will not find even
One more new morning

Why must I stay here
Rain comes I’m sitting here
Watching love moving
Away into yesterday

Winter is blue
Everything’s leaving
Fires are now burning
And life has no reason

I am alone
Waiting for nothing
If my heart freezes
I won’t feel the breaking

Why must I stay here
Rain comes I’m sitting here
Watching love moving
Away into yesterday

Source:

http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/3530822107858572465/

Mamas & Papas – California Dreamin’ (1965)

Video:

Lyrics:

All the leaves are brown and the sky is gray.
I’ve been for a walk on a winter’s day.
I’d be safe and warm if I was in L.A.;
California dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.

Stopped in to a church I passed along the way.
Well I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray.
You know the preacher liked the cold;
He knows I’m gonna stay.
California dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.

All the leaves are brown and the sky is gray.
I’ve been for a walk on a winter’s day.
If I didn’t tell her I could leave today;
California dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.
California dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.
California dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/mamasandthepapas/californiadreamin.html

Simon & Garfunkel – Hazy Shade of Winter (1966)

Video:

Lyrics:

Time, time, time, see what’s become of me.
While I looked around for my possibilities,
I was so hard to please.
But look around, the leaves are brown,
And the sky is a hazy shade of winter.
Hear the salvation army band
Down by the riverside, it’s bound to be a better ride
Than what you’ve got planned,
Carry your cup in your hand.
And look around you, the leaves are brown now,
And the sky is a hazy shade of winter.
Hang on to your hopes, my friend.
That’s an easy thing to say but if your hopes should pass away,
It’s simply pretend, that you can build them again.
Look around, the grass is high, the fields are ripe,
It’s the springtime of my life.
Oh, seasons change with scenery,
Weaving time in a tapestry,
Won’t you stop and remember me?
At any convenient time.
Funny how my memory skips while looking over manuscripts
Of unpublished rhyme,
Drinking my vodka and rhyme.
I look around, the leaves are brown,
There’s a patch of snow on the ground,
Look around…

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/simongarfunkel/ahazyshadeofwinter.html

The Bangles – Hazy Shade of Winter (1987/2011 Cover)

Video:

Tom Rush – Urge for Going (1968)

Video:

Lyrics:

And I awoke today and found the frost perched on the town
It hovered in a frozen sky and gobbled summer down
When the sun turns traitor cold
And shivering trees are standing in a naked row
I get the urge for going but I never seem to go
And I get the urge for going when the meadow grass is turning brown
Summertime is falling down winter’s closing in
I had a girl in summertime with summer colored skin
And not another man in town my darling’s heart could win
But when the leaves fell trembling down
And bully winds did rub their face down in the snow
She got the urge for going I had to let her go
She got the urge for going when the meadow grass was turning brown
And summertime was falling down and winters closing in
Now the warriors of winter they give a cold triumphant shout
All that stays is dying all that lives is getting out
See the geese in chevron flight
Flapping and a-racin on before the snow
Got the urge for going they’ve got the wings to go
And they get the urge for going when the meadow grass is turning brown
Summertime is falling down and winter’s closing in
I’ll ply the fire with kindling, I’ll pull the blankets to my chin
I’ll lock the vagrant winter out I’ll bolt my wandering in
I’d like to call back summertime
And have her stay for just another month or so
But she’s got the urge for going I guess she’ll have to go
And she’s gets the urge for going when the meadow grass is turning
brown
All her empire’s are falling down winter’s closing in
And I get the urge for going when the meadow grass is turning brown
And summertime is falling down

Source:

http://www.allthelyrics.com/es/lyrics/tom_rush/urge_for_going-lyrics-1168692.html

The Doors – Wintertime Love (1968)

Video:

Lyrics:

Wintertime winds blow cold the season
Fallen in love, I’m hopin’ to be
Wind is so cold, is that the reason?
Keeping you warm, your hands touching me

Come with me dance, my dear
Winter’s so cold this year
You are so warm
My wintertime love to be

Winter time winds blue and freezin’
Comin’ from northern storms in the sea
Love has been lost, is that the reason?
Trying desperately to be free

Come with me dance, my dear
Winter’s so cold this year
And you are so warm
My wintertime love to be

La, la, la, la

Come with me dance, my dear
Winter’s so cold this year
You are so warm
My wintertime love to be

Source:

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Wintertime-Love-lyrics-The-Doors/736AA96CDF69B104482568970034F732

Harry Nilson – Snow (1970)

Video:

Lyrics:

Snow
Fills the fields we used to know 
and the little park where we would go
Sleeps far below
In the snow
Gone
It’s all over, and you’re gone
But the memory lives on, although
Our dreams lie buried
In the snow
Sometimes the wind blows through the trees
And I think I hear you callin’ me
But all I see is snow
Everywhere I go
As the cold winter sun sinks low
I walk alone
Through the snow

Source:

https://www.musixmatch.com/es/letras/Harry-Nilsson/Snow-Alternate-Version#

Ann Murray – Snowbird (1970)

Video:

Lyrics:

Beneath this snowy mantle cold and clean
The unborn grass lies waiting
For its coat to turn to green
The snowbird sings the song he always sings
And speaks to me of flowers
That will bloom again in spring

When I was young
My heart was young then, too
Anything that it would tell me
That’s the thing that I would do
But now I feel such emptiness within
For the thing that I want most in life’s
The thing that I can’t win

Spread your tiny wings and fly away
And take the snow back with you
Where it came from on that day
The one I love forever is untrue
And if I could you know that I would
Fly away with you

The breeze along the river seems to say
That he’ll only break my heart again
Should I decide to stay
So, little snowbird
Take me with you when you go
To that land of gentle breezes
Where the peaceful waters flow

Spread your tiny wings and fly away
And take the snow back with you
Where it came from on that day
The one I love forever is untrue
And if I could you know that I would
Fly away with you

Yeah, if I could I know that I would
Fl-y-y-y-y away with you

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/annemurray/snowbird.html

Yoko Ono – Listen, The Snow is Falling (1971)

Video:

Lyrics:

Listen, the snow is falling o’er town,
Listen the snow is falling ev’rywhere.
Between empire state building
And between trafalgar square.
Listen, the snow is falling o’er town.

Listen, the snow is falling o’er town,
Listen the snow is falling ev’rywhere.
Between your bed and mine,
Between your head and my mind.
Listen, the snow is falling o’er town.

Between tokyo and paris,
Between london and dallas,
Between your love and mine.
Listen, the snow is falling ev’rywhere.

Snowfling, snowfall, snowfall,
Listen, listen,
Listen, baby,
Listen.

Source:

http://www.lyricsmania.com/listen_snow_is_falling_lyrics_yoko_ono.html

Galaxie 500 – Listen, Snow is Falling (1990 Cover)

Video:

The Rolling Stones – Winter (1973)

Video & Lyrics:

Frank Zappa – Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow (1974)

Video:

Lyrics:

Dreamed I was an Eskimo
Frozen wind began to blow
Under my boots and around my toes
The frost that bit the ground below
It was a hundred degrees below zero

And my mama cried
And my mama cried
Nanook, a-no-no
Nanook, a-no-no
Don’t be a naughty Eskimo
Save your money, don’t go to the show

Well I turned around and I said oh, oh oh
Well I turned around and I said oh, oh oh
Well I turned around and I said ho, ho
And the northern lights commenced to glow
And she said, with a tear in her eye
Watch out where the huskies go, and don’t you eat that yellow snow
Watch out where the huskies go, and don’t you eat that yellow snow

Source:

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/f/frank+zappa/dont+eat+the+yellow+snow_20056563.html

Jesse Malin & The St. Marks Social (2011 Cover)

Video:

Rich Robinson – WInter (2012 Cover)

Video:

Steve Miller Band – Winter Time (1977)

Video:

Lyrics:

In the winter time
When all the leaves are brown
And the wind blows so chill
And the birds have all flown for the summer
I’m callin’, hear me callin’, hear me callin’

In the winter time
When all the leaves are brown
And the wind blows so chill
And the birds have all flown for the summer
I’m callin’, hear me callin’, hear me callin’
I’m callin’, hear me callin’, hear me callin’
In the winter time

In the winter time
When all the leaves are brown
And the wind blows so chill
And the birds have all flown for the summer
I’m callin’, hear me callin, hear me callin’

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/stevemillerband/wintertime.html

Angel – The WInter Song (1978)

Video:

Lyrics:

Winter is here
And it’s cold this time of year
There’s snow everywhere in sight
Falling on this winter night

By candlelight
We share this chilly night
There’s frost on the window pane
Winter nights are here again

There’s a feeling in the air
Feel the spirit everywhere
Winter winds on Heaven and earth

By the fireplace
There’s a smile on every face
The ice begins to cling
Listen to the children sing

Looking outside
The city lights all come alive
People running all around
They fill the streets with a happy sound

There’s a feeling in the air
Feel the spirit everywhere
Winter winds on Heaven and earth

Hear the angels join the choir
Let them take the music higher
Through winter days on Heaven and earth

There’s a feeling in the air
Feel the spirit everywhere
Winter winds on Heaven and earth

Hear the angels join the choir
Let them take the music higher
Through winter days on Heaven and earth

Source:

http://www.metrolyrics.com/the-winter-song-lyrics-angel.html

Genesis – Snowbound (1978)

Video:

Lyrics:

Lay your body down upon the midnight snow,
Feel the cold of winter in your hair
Here in a world of your own,
In a casing that’s grown
To a children’s delight
That arrived overnight.

And here they come to play their magic games
Carving names upon your frozen hand.
Here in a world of your own,
Like a sleeper whose eyes
Sees the pain with surprise
As it smothers your cries
They’ll never never know.

Hey there’s a Snowman
Hey, Hey what a Snowman
Pray for the Snowman
Ooh, Ooh what a Snowman
They say a snow year’s a good year
Filled with the love of all who lie so deep.

Smiling faces tear your body to the ground
Covered red that only we can see.
Here in a ball that they made
From the snow on the ground,
See it rolling away
Wild eyes to the sky
They’ll never, never know.

Hey there’s a Snowman
Hey what a Snowman
Pray for the Snowman
Ooh, Ooh what a Snowman
They say a snow year’s a good year
Filled with the love of all who lie so deep.

Hey there goes the Snowman
Hey,hey there what a Snowman
Hey there lies the Snowman
Hey he was a Snowman
They say a snow year’s a good year
Filled with the love of all who lie so deep.

Hey,there goes the snowman
Hey,hey there what a snowman…

Source:

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Snowbound-lyrics-Genesis/CFC4CDF06AC993F34825696000167560

XTC – Snowman (1982)

Video:

Lyrics:

It isn’t even winter but I’m freezing, freezing
This sort of feeling isn’t pleasing
And what I want to know, man
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

It isn’t even winter but I’m freezing, freezing
This sort of feeling isn’t pleasing
And what I want to know, man
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

She’s been building me, up quite steadily
Seems like I’ve been here years and years and years and years
I wait patiently, froze in history
All ice water is tears and tears and tears and tears

She treats me far too frosty
This hanging on has cost me dear

It isn’t even winter, I’m shivering, shivering
Waiting for the love that’s not delivering
What I want to know, man
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

It isn’t even winter and I’m shivering, shivering
Waiting for the love that’s not delivering
What I want to know
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

She’s been building me, up quite steadily
Seems like I’ve been here years and years and years and years
I wait patiently, froze in history
All ice water is tears and tears and tears and tears

She treats me far too frosty
This hanging on has cost me

It seems you would say I was too soft hearted
If you made a dunce cap I’d done it
People will always be tempted to wipe their feet
On anything with ‘Welcome’ written on it

It isn’t even winter and I’m freezing, freezing
And this sort of feeling isn’t pleasing
And what I want to know, man
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

It’s just a little winter and I’m shivering, shivering
Waiting for the love that’s not delivering
What I want to know
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?

Why? Oh why, does she treat me?
Why? Oh why, does she treat me, does she treat me
Why? Oh why, does she treat me like a snowman?
Why? Oh why, Yes, like a snowman

Source:

http://www.metrolyrics.com/snowman-lyrics-xtc.html

Aztec Camera – Walk Out to Winter (1983)

Video:

Lyrics:

Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chill will wake you, high and dry, you’ll wonder why

Met in the summer and walked ‘til the fall
And breathless we talked, it was tongues
Despite what they’ll say, wasn’t youth, we hit the truth

Faces of strummer that fell from the wall
But nothing is left where they hung
Sweet and bitter, they’re what we found
So drink them down and

Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chill will wake you, high and dry, you’ll wonder why
Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chance is buried just below the blinding snow

You burn in the breadline and ribbons and all
So walk to winter, you won’t be late, you always wait
This generation, the walk to the wall
But I’m not angry, get your gear, get out of here and

Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chill will wake you, high and dry, you’ll wonder why
Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chance is buried just below the blinding snow

Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
Chill will wake you, high and dry, you’ll wonder why
Walk out to winter, swear I’ll be there
You blind, snow blind, this is why, this is why

Source:

http://www.metrolyrics.com/walk-out-to-winter-lyrics-aztec-camera.html

The Pogues – Farytale of New York (1988)

Video:

Lyrics:

Tori Amos – Winter (1992)

Video:

Lyrics:

Snow can wait I forgot my mittens
Wipe my nose get my new boots on
I get a little warm in my heart when I think of winter
I put my hands in my father’s glove
I run off where the drifts get deeper

Sleeping Beauty it drips me with a frown
I hear a voice you must learn to stand up
For yourself cause I can’t always be around

He says when you gonna make up your mind
When you gonna love you as much as I do
When you gonna make up your mind
‘Cause things are gonna change so fast
All the white horses are still in bed
I tell you that I’ll always want you near
You say that things change my dear

Boys get discovered as winter melts
Flowers come pleading for the sun
Years go by and I’m used to waiting
With a ring with some snowman’s
Mirror mirror where’s the crystal palace
But I can only see myself

Skating around the truth who I am
But I know the Ice is getting thin

When you gonna make up your mind
When you gonna love you as much as I do
When you gonna make up your mind
‘Cause things are gonna change so fast
All the white horses are still in bed
I tell you that I’ll always want you near
You say that things change my dear

Hair is gray and the fire is burring
So many dreams on the shelf
You say I wanted you to be proud of me
I always wanted that myself

When you gonna make up your mind
When you gonna love you as much as I do
When you gonna make up your mind
‘Cause things are gonna change so fast
All the white horses have gone ahead
I tell you that I’ll always want you near
You say that things change my dear

Never change
All the white horses

Source:

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/t/tori+amos/winter_20139495.html

Joshua Radin – Winter (2004)

Video:

Lyrics:

I should know who I am by now
I walk the record stand somehow
Thinkin’ of winter
The name is the splinter inside me
While I wait

And I remember the sound
Of your November downtown
And I remember the truth
A warm December with you

But I don’t have to make this mistake
And I don’t have to stay this way
If only I would wake

The walk has all been cleared by now
Your voice is all I hear somehow
Calling out winter
Your voice is the splinter inside me
While I wait

And I remember the sound
Of your November downtown
And I remember the truth
A warm December with you
But I don’t have to make this mistake
And I don’t have to stay this way
If only I would wake

I could have lost myself
In rough blue waters in your eyes
And I miss you still

Oh I remember the sound
Of your November downtown
And I remember the truth
A warm December with you
But I don’t have to make this mistake
And I don’t have to stay this way
If only I would wake

Source:

http://www.lyricsmania.com/winter_lyrics_joshua_radin.html

Fleet Foxes – White Winter Hymnal (2008)

Video:

Lyrics:

I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the,
I was following the pack,
All swaddled in their coats
With scarves of red tied ‘round their throats
To keep their little heads
From fallin’ in the snow
And I turned ‘round and there you go.
And Michael you would fall,
And turn the white snow
Red as strawberries in the summertime.

I was following the pack,
All swaddled in their coats
With scarves of red tied ‘round their throats
To keep their little heads
From fallin’ in the snow
And I turned ‘round and there you go.
And Michael you would fall,
And turn the white snow
Red as strawberries in the summertime.

I was following the pack,
All swaddled in their coats
With scarves of red tied ‘round their throats
To keep their little heads
From fallin’ in the snow
And I turned ‘round and there you go.
And Michael you would fall,
And turn the white snow
Red as strawberries in the summertime….

Source:

http://www.metrolyrics.com/white-winter-hymnal-lyrics-fleet-foxes.html

Pentatonix – White Winter Hymnal (2014 Cover)

Vídeo:

D.I.A – White Winter Hymnal (2014 Cover – Korean)

Video:

Sara Bereilles & Ingrid Michaelson – Winter Song (2008)

Video:

Video & Lyrics:

Ronan Keatin – Winter Song (2009 Cover)

Video:

Ray Lamontagne – Winter Birds (2008)

Video:

Lyrics:

It’s the widow now that owns that angry plow
The spartan mule and the crippled cow
The fallow field that will yield no more
As the fox lay sleeping beneath her kitchen floor

The stream can’t contain such the withering rain
And from the pasture the fence it is leaning away
The clouds crack and growl like some great cat on the prowl
Crying out I am, I am over and over again

The days grow short as the nights grow long
The kettle sings its tortured songs
A many petaled kiss I place upon her brow
Oh my lady, lady I am loving you now

The winter birds have gone back again
Here the sprightly chickadee, gone now is the willow wren
In passing greet each other as if old, old friends
And to the voiceless trees it is their own they will lend

The days grow short as the nights grow long
The kettle sings its tortured songs
A many petaled kiss I place upon her brow
Oh my lady, lady I am loving you now

Though all these things will change the memories will remain
As green to gold and gold to brown
The leaves will fall to feed the ground
And in their falling make no sound
Oh my lady, lady, I am loving you now

I’ve gathered all my money, I’m going to town
To buy my lady a long and flowing gown
‘Cause come tomorrow morning we’re off to the county fair
I’ll find a yellow flower and I will lace it in her hair

The days grow short as the nights grow long
The kettle sings its tortured songs
A many petaled kiss I place upon her brow
Oh my lady, lady I am loving you now
Oh my lady, lady I am loving you now

Source:

http://www.metrolyrics.com/winter-birds-lyrics-ray-lamontagne.html

Mumford & Sons Winter Winds (2009)

Video:

Lyrics:

As the winter winds litter London with lonely hearts
Oh the warmth in your eyes swept me into your arms
Was it love or fear of the cold that led us through the night?
For every kiss your beauty trumped my doubt

And my head told my heart
“Let love grow”
But my heart told my head
“This time no
This time no”

We’ll be washed and buried one day my girl
And the time we were given will be left for the world
The flesh that lived and loved will be eaten by plague
So let the memories be good for those who stay

And my head told my heart
“Let love grow”
But my heart told my head
“This time no”
Yes, my heart told my head
“This time no
This time no”

Oh the shame that sent me off from the God that I once loved
Was the same that sent me into your arms
Oh and pestilence is won when you are lost and I am gone
And no hope, no hope will overcome

And if your strife strikes at your sleep
Remember spring swaps snow for leaves
You’ll be happy and wholesome again
When the city clears and sun ascends

And my head told my heart
“Let love grow”
But my heart told my head
“This time no”

And my head told my heart
“Let love grow”
But my heart told my head
“This time no
This time no”

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/mumfordsons/winterwinds.html

Fountains of Wayne – Valley Winter Song (2009)

Video:

Lyrics:

Hey Sweet Annie
Don’t take it so bad
You know the summer’s coming soon
Though the interstate is choking under salt and dirty sand
And it seems the sun is hiding from the moon

Your daddy told you
When you were a girl
The kind of things that come to those who wait
So give it a rest girl
Take a deep breath girl
And meet me at the Bay State tonight

And the snow is coming down
On our New England town
And it’s been falling all day long
What else is new
What could I do
I wrote a valley winter song
To play for you

And late December
Can drag a man down
You feel it deep in your gut
Short days and afternoons spent pottering around
In a dark house with the windows painted shut

Remember New York
Staring outside
As reckless winter made its way
From Staton Island to the Upper West Side
Whiting out our streets along the way

And the snow is coming down
On our New England town
And it’s been falling all day long
What else is new
What can I do
But sing this valley winter song
I wrote for you

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/fountainsofwayne/valleywintersong.html

The Walkmen – While I Shovel the Snow (2010)

Video:

Lyrics:

Well they say, “Can’t please everyone”
But I’m stuck on a winning streak
Well today, there’s clarity
And tonight, I see tomorrow
All at once, the winter’s here
All the lochs are frozen over
As I look in back of me
See a shape beside the walkway

Half of my life, I’ve been watching
Half of my life, I’ve been waking up
Birds in the sky could warn me
There’s no life like the slow life

So for now, I’ll take my time
For now, I can’t be bothered
But I learned a lot of things
And I fudged a lot of numbers

Once again, the winter’s here
All the lochs are frozen over
So I look in back of me
See a shape beside the walkway

Half of my life, I’ve been watching
Half of my life, I’ve been waking up
Birds in the sky could warn me
There’s no life like the slow life

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/walkmen/whileishovelthesnow.html

The Coral – Walking in the Winter (2010)

Video:

Lyrics:

We went walking in the winter
It was the coldest
Time of year

It’s where I handed you a letter
You turned around
I disappeared

It said someday
I’ll find my way
And we’ll go walking
In the winter

It’s so hard to make a living
When the world
Is so unkind

But it’s not something
That you’re given
It’s something that
You got to find

It said someday
I’ll find my way
And we’ll go walking
In the winter

And it’s o.k. to close your eyes
Those silver sailing ships
Go sailing by
It’s all in your mind
It’s gonna be alright
This time

Seasons change
Into summer
Fires burning in the dark

I hope sometimes
You read my letter
And know I had to
Play my part

It said someday
I’ll find my way
And we’ll go walking
In the winter

And we’ll go walking
In the winter

Source:

http://www.songlyrics.com/the-coral/walking-in-the-winter-lyrics/

The Head & The Heart – Winter Song (2011)

Video:

Video & Lyrics:

Kate Bush – Snowflake – 50 Words for Snow (2011)

Video:

Lyrics:

1 drifting
2 twisting
3 whiteout
4 blackbird braille
5 Wenceslasaire
6 avalanche
Come on man, you’ve got 44 to go,
come on man, you’ve got 44 to go.
Come on man, you’ve got 44 to go,
come on man, you’ve got 44 to go.
7 swans-a-melting
8 deamondi-pavlova
9 eiderfalls
10 Santanyeroofdikov
11 stellatundra
12 hunter’s dream
13 faloop’njoompoola
14 zebranivem
15 spangladasha
16 albadune
17 hironocrashka
18 hooded-wept
Come on Joe, you’ve got 32 to go,
come on Joe, you’ve got 32 to go.
Come on now, you’ve got 32 to go,
come on now, you’ve got 32 to go.
Don’t you know it’s not just the Eskimo.
Let me hear your 50 words for snow.
19 phlegm de neige
20 mountainsob
21 anklebreaker
22 erase-o-dust
23 shnamistoflopp’n
24 terrablizza
25 whirlissimo
26 vanilla swarm
27 icyskidski
28 robber’s veil
Come on Joe, just 22 to go,
come on Joe, just 22 to go.
Come on Joe, just you and the Eskimos,
Come on now, just 22 to go.
Come on now, just 22 to go,
Let me hear your 50 words for snow.
29 creaky-creaky
30 psychohail
31 whippoccino
32 shimmerglisten
33 Zhivagodamarbletash
34 sorbetdeluge
35 sleetspoot’n
36 melt-o-blast
37 slipperella
38 boomerangablanca
39 groundberry down
40 meringuerpeaks
41 crème-bouffant
42 peDtaH ‘ej chIS qo’
43 deep’nhidden
44 bad for trains
45 shovelcrusted
46 anechoic
47 blown from polar fur
48 vanishing world
49 mistraldespair
50 snow.

Source:

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/k/kate+bush/50+words+for+snow_20983535.html

Kate Bush – Snowflake (2011)

Video:

Lyrics:

I was born in a cloud…
Now I am falling.
I want you to catch me.
Look up and you’ll see me.
You know you can hear me.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
We’re over a forest.
There’s millions of snowflakes.
We’re dancing.
The world is so loud. Keep falling and I’ll find you.
I am ice and dust. I am sky.
I can see horses wading through snowdrifts.
My broken hearts, my fabulous dances.
My fleeting song, fleeting.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
My broken hearts, my fabulous dance.
My fleeting song.
My twist and shout.
I am ice and dust and light. I am sky and here.
I can hear people.
I think you are near me now.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
We’re over a forest.
It’s midnight at Christmas.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
I think I can see you.
There’s your long, white neck.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
Now I am falling.
Look up and you’ll see me.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
In a moment or two.
I’ll be with you.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.
Be ready to catch me.
The world is so loud. Keep falling. I’ll find you.

Source:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/katebush/snowflake.html

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Yes, You can!!!

7 trucos para aprender inglés y no morir en el intento

La fama nos persigue allá donde vayamos: los españoles cojeamos a la hora de hablar inglés. Y no será porque no queramos dominar el idioma: uno de cada cuatro españoles renunciaría a un año de sexo si con eso se asegurase un inglés perfecto y el 64% pagaría hasta 10.000 euros por una píldora del bilingüismo, según un estudio que Cambridge University Press publicó el año pasado.

Poco a poco, sin embargo, vamos abandonando las esperanzas de aprender inglés por arte de magia y nos vamos poniendo manos a la obra. Varias academias consultadas por El Huffington Post reconocen que en los últimos meses han tenido una “avalancha” de inscripciones y el aprendizaje de inglés es en muchos casos uno de los propósitos de año nuevo más repetidos. Un estudio de ABA English apunta a que enero es el mes preferido para ponerse manos a la obra.

Descartada, de momento, la píldora del bilingüismo y aceptando que renunciar al sexo no va a mejorar nuestro nivel de inglés… ¿Hay algún truco para dominar ese idioma? Los expertos sienten decirte que no hay fórmulas mágicas. Para hablar inglés o cualquier otro idioma se necesita tiempo, paciencia y, sobre todo, mucha constancia.

Lo que sí hay, subrayan, son trucos para que ese proceso no sea tedioso y poco fructífero. Aquí tienes siete de ellos.

1. Fíjate unos objetivos

Los expertos recomiendan que, antes de lanzarte a la aventura del inglés, dibujes muy claramente a dónde quieres llegar: no es lo mismo necesitar el idioma sólo para viajar como turista que para trabajar en un entorno multinacional o para hacer presentaciones profesionales.

“Hay ciertos trucos o caminos para prepararse para un objetivo concreto u otro”, destaca Julio Redondas, director de comunicación de Cambridge University Press.

En este sentido, afirma, si tu reto no es aprender inglés para algo concreto y sí dominar el idioma “con todas las letras, con fluidez y con todo lo que eso significa” sólo hay tres trucos: constancia, esfuerzo y tiempo. “Los atajos existen, pero que eso te vaya a hacer tener un mejor nivel de inglés… es complicado”, subraya.

2. Elige bien una academia (y aprovéchalo)

Vale, ya has pensado para qué necesitas el inglés y a dónde quieres llegar. El siguiente paso importante sería ahorrar y apuntarte a una academia que se adapte a tus necesidades.

Hay que tener muchas cosas en cuenta a la hora de inscribirse. “Primero tienes que analizar cuál es tu perfil. Preguntarte: ¿Yo para qué quiero aprender inglés? No es lo mismo querer sacarse un título, como el First, porque para eso hay un sistema que no es el mismo que para hacer presentaciones corporativas ni para irte a trabajar en el extranjero”, explica Redondas.

Es difícil, asegura, que todas las academias y todos los libros cubran todas las necesidades porque cada una suele estar especializada en un ámbito. Y eso tienes que tenerlo muy en cuenta.

La aventura del inglés, insisten los expertos, no acaba cuando te apuntas a una academia. A partir de ahí, tu actitud y tu constancia jugarán un papel clave. “Las academias, como los gimnasios, se nutren mucho del abandono, de gente que se matricula y luego no va”, destaca Redondas.

Además, e independientemente de cuál sea tu objetivo, tienes que fijarte en que la academia donde te apuntes tenga grupos reducidos y de que las clases sean interactivas, para que puedas poner en práctica tus conocimientos.

“Y, por supuesto, tienes que poner de tu parte. Si vas a una academia y te sientas allí, estás tres horas, te hablan pero tú no haces nada por practicar la lengua… No te va a servir de mucho”, avisa Virginia Vinuesa, profesora de inglés en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid.

3. Escucha música en inglés

Julio Redondas insiste en que escuchar música en inglés es una de las actividades más útiles que puedes encontrar para familiarizarte con el idioma.

“Siempre hay unos cantantes o unos grupos que te gustan. Teniendo eso en cuenta, es fácil que te enganches porque el soniquete, el estilo, lo que hay alrededor del inglés, te gusta”, destaca. Además, afirma, la sonoridad hace que recuerdes las letras de las canciones y las palabras que las forman de una manera más natural.

“Pero eso no significa que te vaya a entrar solo. Vas a tener que leer la letras y, en función de tu nivel, tirar del diccionario si quieres saber lo que se dice”, advierte Redondas, quien admite que no es fácil pero es “menos exigente que ver una serie de una hora en la que quizá te pierdes en el minuto dos.”

4. Aficiónate a las películas y series en VO, pero sin pasarte

Pese a todo, los expertos aseguran que ver series y películas en inglés ayuda mucho a perder el miedo al idioma. Pero siempre teniendo en cuenta tu nivel y el nivel de lo que te dispones a ver. “Si partes de un nivel básico y te pones a ver series sin subtítulos lo más probable es que te frustres y que al cabo de diez minutos lo dejes. Es una actividad buena, pero no vale todo”, indica Redondas.

Pone el ejemplo de la serie The Wire, donde se utiliza mucho vocabulario relacionado con la calle y el crimen. Si tienes un nivel medio y quieres ver esa serie sin subtítulos… Quizá acabes de los nervios.

A la hora de ver películas y series hay cuatro niveles de exigencia:

A-. Verlas dobladas al español. Así te enterarás de todo, pero no aprenderás nada.

B-. Verlas en inglés con subtítulos en español. Los expertos recomiendan esta opción para niveles bajos porque, para otros más elevados, es poco útil. “Te dedicas más a leer y no atiendes tanto a lo que dicen, así que no asocias sonidos con palabras, no te fijas en cómo se pronuncia cada palabra”, explica Virginia Vinuesa.

C-. Verlas en inglés con subtítulos en inglés. Vinuesa recomienda esta opción para niveles intermedios porque así vinculas palabras con sonidos. Lo que comúnmente se conoce como ‘hacer oído’.

D-. Verlas en inglés sin subtítulos. En general, los expertos recomiendan esta opción para niveles avanzados porque, de lo contrario, puede que no entiendas nada y te frustres.

5. Lee libros en inglés (pero con cabeza)

Los expertos coinciden unánimemente en que leer libros en inglés es uno de los mejores métodos para aprender vocabulario de forma entretenida y acostumbrarte al modo en que se construyen las frases en el otro idioma.

Pero, al igual que en el caso de las películas y las series, tienes que tener muy en cuenta cuál es tu nivel y la dificultad del libro que quieres leer porque “todo lo que no está al alcance de nuestras posibilidades causa frustración”, explica Isabel Aráez, profesora de Educación Secundaria en el Instituto Felipe de Borbón de Murcia y colaboradora experta en educación para la Comisión Europea.

“Un aprendiz de español no comienza leyendo el Quijote. Tampoco podemos nosotros adentrarnos en el Ulysses de James Joyce así por las buenas”, insiste. En este sentido, Aráez indica que existen gran variedad de recursos de lectura adaptados a cada nivel de comprensión lectora, desde el inicial al avanzado o la versión original.

Los expertos no se ponen de acuerdo, sin embargo, en el mejor método a la hora de leer. Unos insisten en que es importante usar el diccionario para las palabras que se desconocen, pero otros insisten en que es mejor ir deduciendo el significado por el contexto.

6. Lee periódicos extranjeros

Los expertos también recomiendan leer periódicos en inglés, algo mucho más sencillo ahora gracias a las ediciones digitales de los diarios. “Exponerse a un vocabulario, giros lingüísticos y expresiones idiosincrásicas del ámbito periodístico es algo que puede resultar muy enriquecedor para el alumno a partir del nivel intermedio”, explica Aráez.

Si no llegas a ese nivel de competencia, es mejor que recurras a lecturas adaptadas.

7. Búscate amigos nativos y habla

Después de todo esto, acéptalo: para llegar a dominar el idioma tendrás que hablarlo, aunque te dé vergüenza. Virginia Vinuesa explica que ahora es mucho más sencillo practicarlo gracias a la tecnología.

“Con las redes sociales es más fácil. Puedes hacer amigos nativos y montar grupos de conversaciones por Skype. Hay muchos bares y pubs que hacen sesiones para hablar inglés con nativos”, asegura. Es el paso más importante, y quizá el más complicado, de la aventura del inglés.

Fuente:

http://www.huffingtonpost.es/2015/01/03/como-estudiar-ingles_n_6157370.html?utm_hp_ref=sociedad

New Resolutions for 2015?

20 Resolutions Everyone Should Make

t’s time for New Year’s resolutions. Most of us have a love-hate relationship with this once-a-year list. Maybe the same few goals keep popping up year after year, or maybe you throw it all out the window and say screw the list. But no matter how you feel about them, setting intentions as the New Year approaches is a smart idea for a balanced life.

There’s a reason traditional resolutions don’t stick. Things like losing weight, ending a nail-biting habit, or paying off debt are all good goals. But it can be hard to put your heart into them.

If you really want to reach new heights, consider writing your goals with more heart and intention. Focus on the feelings you want to feel in the New Year and the big picture.

Instead of writing down “lose weight” or “hit my goal weight,” make a resolution to feel good in your skin and fall in love with your body. This empowers you from within, and you’ll create goals with your heart. When your heart is your compass, you’re more enthusiastic and focused.

If you want to feel more alive and present in your life, consider revising your New Year’s resolution list. Here are 20 things to consider:

1. Release what no longer serves you.

2. Live less out of habit and focus on intent.

3. Raise your standards.

4. Look for the good in others instead of focusing on the bad.

5. Be OK with not being OK.

6. Look in the mirror and like what you see.

7. Be kind to yourself when you’re learning something new.

8. Be OK with not knowing. Learn to love the journey.

9. Stop apologizing.

10. Let love guide you.

11. Stop rushing things that need time to grow.

12. Know the difference between giving up and knowing when you’ve had enough. Let enough be enough.

13. Travel to that place you keep thinking about. It’s in your heart for a reason.

14. Trust yourself more.

15. Let go of who you think you are so you become who you want to be.

16. Be thankful for today.

17. Don’t worry about how your life looks. Instead, focus on how it feels.

18. Invite your inner child out to play daily.

19. Let yourself be you.

20. Stop trying so hard to get to where you think you should be and see you are exactly where you need to be.

Source:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-16705/20-resolutions-everyone-should-make.html

7 Ways to Make 2015 Your Year to Shine!

With the new year upon us, it’s hard not to pick up on the contagious positive energy of making powerful life-changing intentions. New year, new you, right? Perhaps that means: losing weight, getting organized, spending less, saving more, feeling healthy, learning something new, or maybe even helping others, all of which top the list of the most common goals going into the start of a new calendar year. Unfortunately, New Year’s resolutions are notorious for their short-lived journey here on earth. In fact, a study by Stanton University showed that just 8 percent of New Year’s goals ever see themselves into fruition. Moreso, this same study shows that only 25 percent of these goals set will even make it past the first week of the year. Ouch! Now, those are depressing statistic.

Goal-setting can actually be immensely powerful as our beautiful intentions become expressed letting our desires be known to the Universe. But, as the saying goes, “A goal without a plan is just a dream.” Those who succeed in turning their vision into reality go much further. While intention is a powerful first step, it demands additional action steps to actually bring the vision to life.

As an entrepreneur who has spent many new years at the goal-setting table, and who has more recently been the facilitator of helping others bring their own dreams to fruition as a coach and mentor, I’ve seen and experienced first-hand what works and what doesn’t in the world of making dreams happen. And, hence, here are my top seven ways to beat the statistics and make 2015 your year to shine!

  1. Set goals with soul. My own personal belief is that the reason so many New Year’s resolutions become failures is because a lot of people are just making them because they’re “supposed” to. It’s like saying, “Okay, another new year is upon us, I guess I should throw some goals out there.” But, you’re not going to get very far with that mindset. Instead, dive in a little deeper and get into the “why” behind the “what.” So, instead of saying “I want to lose weight,” which is kind of lacking in the soul department, how about really digging in and saying, “I want to lose weight because I’m tired of feeling like crap. And, I want to be alive and healthy to see my children graduate high school and to see my grandchildren be born, etc.” Or, maybe your goals in financial in nature. Making more money is just scratching the surface of things, but dig in deeper and consider what that financial freedom would feel like for you? Maybe you want to provide a certain life for your children or start a foundation that gives back to a cause that is super important to you. Now, that has some grit to it as it digs deeper into the heart and touches on emotion which equals staying power.
  2. Hash out the details. Beyond writing the goal down, it’s important to get into the actual strategy of achieving them. Imagine finally reaching the finish line and consider all of the steps that would have needed to be taken to get there. If we were to use the weight loss goal again as an example (it is one of the most popular new year’s goal, after all), we could agree that eating well and exercising are necessary to achieve that particular goal. However, the fine details of what that actually looks like can vary greatly from person to person. An individual strategy would need to get into the specific dates and times workouts would take place and what other commitments might need to be juggled to make it happen. The strategy would also address everything else from what types of food to incorporate into the meal planning, to when to do the shopping, and what days to actually do the cooking. Hashing out these details and then syncing them into your daily life by actually scheduling them on your calendar will make a night and day difference between goals that are soon forgotten and your wildest dreams actually coming true. This same line of thinking can be used for business, relationship, spiritual, and any other type of goals your heart desires.
  3. Tell the world (or at least anybody that will listen). The more we talk about our goals and dreams, they more real they feel and the better the chances of them coming to life. Express them not only in your own dream journals, but to friends and family, on social media, and within your networking groups, this is both the power of intention and law of attraction in action. What we focus on, grows. So, don’t keep your dreams in the dark. Bring them into the light and keep them there instead of letting them fade away back into the shadows. Water and nurture them like the beautiful little seeds that they are and help give them every chance to grow. And, while you’re shouting from the rooftops, don’t be afraid to also ask for help, guidance and support along the way. The more two way conversations you have around your desires, the more supported you will feel and the more they will manifest.
  4. Build in some accountability. Human beings are wired for connection. Therefore, having some sort of built-in accountability works so much better than trying to go at it alone. When we partner up, hire a coach, or join a group of like-minded folks, we substantially increase our chances of making things happen. Having a network in place to share ideas with, be supported by, and be held accountable to gives us the courage and inspiration to carry on and the motivation to actually get done what we said we would. (Nobody wants to report to their accountability partners that they haven’t gotten anything done, right?) Whether you get friends and family to help keep tabs on your progress or join a professional group of some sort, having a team to be accountable to is an invaluable gift to help you keep up with your goals.
  5. Be flexible and easy, like a tree that bends and sways with the wind. A mentor of mine once gave a beautiful analogy that I will never forget She said to hold on to your vision ever so gently, like a baby chick. Imagine holding this soft, fuzzy, sweet and delicate little creature in your hand. You want to do so gently and with love. What would happen to that adorable little chick if you squeezed too tightly? Not a pretty picture. So, why is it that we often squeeze the life right out of our own dreams? We tend to hold on to our vision too tightly. In our own minds, we want things to play out in an exact and precise way, but reality is this rarely happens. Instead, we must remember that we are powerful co-creators in the Universe (emphasis on the “co”). Sometimes life has other plans in mind. We need to learn to go with the flow and be willing to re-write the vision as life and circumstances change for us. Being open to the synchronicity in your life and taking subtle guidance from the Universe plays a powerful part in bringing your dreams to life.
  6. De-Clutter. Energy is a powerful thing that exists everywhere and in everything. Did you know the flow of energy can be blocked when our lives are cluttered? This could be in the form of a literal state (e.g., a messy house or desk), or perhaps in a more abstract form such as messy financials or relationships. Or, maybe we are just holding on to some past junk that is making it difficult to move forward. No matter how much vision-writing, goal-setting, and accountability we have in place, if our lives are in messy shambles, we must do some spring cleaning before we can truly tap into our infinite potential. Think about some ways you can clean up your own energy space. In what areas of your life can you de-clutter and organize? What are some loose ends that can be tied up? Where are you feeling “messy” and/or incomplete. Clean up, organize, let go, feel light, and allow energy to flow positively and freely.
  7. Listen to your soul. Deep in our hearts and soul, there is a seed planted. It’s our passion and life purpose gently trying to manifest itself in all that we do. It is up to each of us to in tune to this divine truth. Connecting with our soul is a mission all in of itself. It takes a combination of going within, experiencing stillness, cultivating mindfulness, and connecting with the signs from the Universe as they play out around us. Once we get a glimpse of this, we must tune out anyone or anything that tries to sway us away. Being true to ourselves in a world that is constantly trying to change us is one of the most difficult challenges any of us will face in our lifetime. So, once we start to get those glimpses into what lights us up, what we’re here for, how we want to feel and to BE in this world, we must guard them carefully and not let the rest of the world take these truths away.

Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dawn-gluskin/7-ways-to-make-2015-your-_b_6388202.html

The psychology behind New Year’s resolutions that actually stick

According to a Marist Poll, 44% of us will make a resolution for 2015. Like previous years, we will once again resolve to lose weight, get organized, save more money, and enjoy life to the fullest.

For real, this time.

But have you ever wondered why new year’s resolutions fail despite your best intentions?

The pattern is dismally familiar. You promise yourself that “I am going to lose weight next year.” You eat nutritiously for a few days and start going to the gym. Then, in a moment of weakness, you binge on leftover cake and chocolate-chip cookies, feel bad about your lack of willpower, slip back into old habits and give up.

Now, thanks to advances in brain science and behavioral research on motivation and habits, experts understand these frustrating patterns of our behavior better than ever before. By putting their insights to work, you can build more willpower and achieve more of your goals over time.

So what does science tell us about goals, motivation and how to stay on track?

First, writing down your goals is critical if you want to accomplish them. Then comes the harder parts:

Tip #1: Connect your goals to something personally meaningful to you.

You are more likely to stay on track with goals when they’re important, interesting or enjoyable for you. This happens when you connect your goals to your deepest values and aspirations.

Why is it really important for you to lose weight? Is it because it improves your feelings of self-worth and gives you energy to do other things; or is it because it allows you to be more active and makes you feel more attractive? Whatever it is, connecting your goals to these personal and emotional benefits are important in achieving them.

Tip #2: Break your goals into smaller milestones

Longer-term goals are never achieved in one go. You need to break longer term goals into smaller tasks or milestones. Accomplishing these milestones will give you a clear sense of progress, let you celebrate small wins and keep you motivated.

Tip #3: Make your milestones immediate and specific

Remember the motivation you have just before a deadline? Milestones should aim to create a similar sense of urgency in you by making them as immediate and specific as possible. Getting started is one of the hardest things in accomplishing a goal. Therefore, the most important task to make immediate is the first. “Lose on pound this week” is good but “Consume 2,000 calories or less today” may be even better.

Goal example: “Lose 15 pounds by June”

Milestone example: “Lose one pound this week”

Tip #4: Let others know about your specific goals

Letting your friends, family or co-workers know about your goals make it more likely that you will succeed. Research shows that this works only when your goals are verifiable. “Write more” is vague but “Write 500 words every week” is verifiable. No one likes to be seen as weak-willed so committing to goals in front of others increases your motivation to achieve them.

Tip #5: Make a “Fresh Start” in case of setbacks

Wharton business school professor Katherine Milkman and her colleagues have done research on the role timing of resolutions plays in building up motivation and overcoming inertia. They have labeled it the “fresh start effect.”

According to the University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology, people who explicitly make resolutions are 10 times more likely to attain their goals than people who don’t explicitly make them.

So go ahead. Make a fresh start and commit to a new year resolution. Make allowances in your mind that failure and setbacks can occur but that you can always start over—and resolve to succeed.

Source:

http://qz.com/318967/the-science-behind-new-years-resolutions-that-actually-stick/

How to Set Intentions on New Year’s Eve to Guarantee a Phenomenal Year Ahead

Preparation is key to every victory in life.

Psychological, emotional and energetic preparing is what separates those that succeed from those that want.

When I began intentionally closing the year, my life felt more deliberate and I achieved so many goals I’ve had for years!

I got pregnant effortlessly, had an amazing twin home birth, traveled to places I’ve always wanted to see, my business soared and abundance flowed in, felt more passionately in love with my husband, and so much more!

So I invite you to set yourself up to thrive in 2015 by doing a short yet potent New Year’s Eve Release & Intend Ceremony that will help you achieve what you desire.

The eve of the last day of the year has long been recognized as an auspicious and sacred time to:

  • reflect and celebrate the year that has passed
  • release thoughts and beliefs that are no longer serving you
  • set clear intentions for the year ahead
  • invite the powerful energy of attraction to manifest your desires

In years past, I have held NY Eve Ceremonies at my home and all of the participants raved about how incredible it was to step into the new year with so much clarity, hope and inspiration!

This year I’m hosting a free virtual Release & Intend ceremony on 12/28, but if you’d rather create your own end-of-the-year ritual (alone or with friends), here are some ideas to guide you.

Set aside at least 30 minutes and choose the elements out of the suggestions below that resonate with you. Most importantly, remember to make this ceremony fun and exciting!

1. CREATE A SACRED SPACE.

You don’t have to do the NY Eve ceremony on the 31st of December. Select a day and time when you (and whoever you invite) will enjoy focusing on setting intentions without interruptions.

When deciding on location, begin with connecting with what a ceremony means to you and what kind of an environment is conducive for feeling united in your heart, mind and soul.

For me, it could mean any of the following:

  • lighting a candle with the intention of illuminating the vision for your next year
  • burning some incense or sage to clear the space
  • creating an altar with things that hold personal meaning such as photographs, art, and sacred objects
  • having a journal and pen ready and maybe even getting a whole collection of art supplies
  • gathering tarot cards or any other tools for connecting with inner wisdom
  • putting on inspiring music
  • dressing up on clothing that makes me feel beautiful, empowered and comfortable

2. CENTER YOURSELF.

Meditate or just do some deep breathing for a 5-10 minutes. Slow down your heart rate. Feel your body and all the present sensations. Drop-in to Presence.

If you are gathering with friends, I recommend someone guiding everyone in a centering meditation.

3. REFLECT ON INTENTIONS FROM THIS YEAR.

If you can read last year’s notes or remember you intentions for this year, it will be useful to reflect and journal your thoughts about them:

  • Have you achieved what you set out to accomplish in the last 12 months?
  • Did you live in alignment with your true intentions and priorities? If not, why?
  • What valuable personal and professional lessons have you learned?

Maybe you feel proud and powerful for making courageous choices. Or maybe you feel angry and frustrated for continuing outdated patterns. All of it is perfectly okay, and I highly suggest removing any internal censoring and having a real heart-to-heart with your journal.

Rest in Napoleon Hill’s wisdom that “Every adversity, every failure, every heartache carries with it the seed on an equal or greater benefit.”

(If you can’t remember any intentions for this year, that’s okay, just think about the general things that are important to you and whether you are living in alignment with them.)

If you want to share this with other people who are doing the ceremony with you, share 2-3 lessons you learned from the year.

And if you love fire, then write down 2-3 habits or beliefs that you know you are ready to release and burn them.

As they go up in flames, know that the consciousness that created this world heard your readiness to shift and will now fully support you in your desire!

4. WRITE DOWN 10 HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS YEAR.

They can be big achievements or more subtle magic moments. Remember how they felt and what made them so special.

If you are present with others, share some of your highlights in all their juicy glory!

Focusing and reliving the most exciting and exhilarating times of your life is one of the most powerful ways of reprogramming your mindset to keep a success score card, instead of a failure tab!

5. DECLARE WHAT YOU WANT NEXT YEAR.

I recommend writing down one intention for each area of your life. I find these wishes to feel more powerful when I state them in present tense so that I feel like I’m already living my desires. Here are four main areas to focus on:

1. Your Health. The health goal can do with fitness or dietary habits or it can be very general, such as: “I tune into my body wisdom and make choices that nourish and support every cell in radiant health.”

2. Your Wealth. The wealth intention can be a specific desire in your career or finances or it can be something like: “I recognize my innate ability to experience an abundance of money, time and love.”

3. Your Relationships. A relationship goal will be more powerful if you can focus on how YOU want to feel instead of how you would like someone else to change. For example: “I love being in satisfying, loving and nurturing relationships” or “I am attracting the perfect companion for me by being the kind of mate I want to attract.”

4. Your Personal Enrichment. Probably the most important goal out of all 3 because it is what feeds your soul, heart and mind. A great way to explore this topic is to free-write all the things that you would be doing if you had all the money, time and freedom you could want.

Look over what you wrote and think of one goal for the year ahead that lights you up. For instance, you could explore meditation programs or new classes: “I love investing in myself by signing up for {blank} program.”

You can also make it as simple as mine for 2015: “I dance every chance I get and remember my freedom, power and beauty.”

6. CHOOSE A THEME FOR NEXT YEAR.

After you have reflected on where you’ve been and where you want to go, it is also useful to pick a theme word or phrase for the year. This focus can be your North Star when making decisions in the coming months.

For example, my focus of 2014 was “I’m Ready.” Anytime I had to make a big decision, I would remind myself that I’m ready and that helped me launch new courses and build a new website, all before I felt I was truly prepared (truthfully, I was never going to feel 100 percent prepared).

The theme can also be a way to recognize when you’ve gotten off balance and help course correct.

My theme for 2015 is the KISS principle — “Keep it simple, silly.”

I have a big sign with those words above my desk and it’s already guiding me to take the path of least resistance and keep things in perspective instead of efforting and trying too hard.

It’s amazing how just a simple phrase can help us remember what our priorities are!

7. SHARE, AMPLIFY, MULTIPLY.

If you are with others, share your intentions and your theme one by one and after each person finished speaking, reflect aloud together: “And so it is!”

And if you did the ceremony on your own, I recommend writing an email to a couple of friends summarizing your desires for 2015 and asking them to help you stay focused in the coming year.

When two or more minds connect with an idea at the same time, the power of the idea becomes greater than the sum of the individual parts.

So share with (supportive) others what you want to develop in your life and you will be amazed how much more fun and easy it will be to journey to your goals.

Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lana-shlafer/how-to-set-intentions-on-_b_6378940.html

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New Year’s Resolution – Graham Colton:

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Mejor aprender idiomas en el 2015 y no esperar al 2016

Ventajas aprender idiomas: 7 razones científicas para hacerlo

1. Mejor “flexibilidad cognitiva”

Según un estudio de The Journal of Neuroscience, los adultos que han hablado dos lenguas desde su infancia tienen mejor flexibilidad cognitiva, es decir, tienen más facilidad para adaptarse a una circunstancia nueva o inesperada que los adultos que sólo hablan una lengua. En el estudio, los participantes tenían que completar una tarea de flexibilidad cognitiva; aunque tanto los adultos monolingües como los bilingües fueron capaces de completarla, los bilingües lo hicieron con más rapidez y además determinadas partes de su cerebro necesitaron menos energía para llevarla a cabo.

2. Agilidad mental durante más tiempo

Esto también se cumple en las personas que aprenden una segunda lengua siendo ya mayores, de acuerdo con un reciente estudio publicado en Annals of Neurology. En la investigación, se realizaron tests de inteligencia a los participantes, hablantes nativos de inglés, cuando tenían 11 años y unas décadas después, cuando cumplieron los 70. La gente que hablaba dos o más lenguas mostró mejores capacidades cognitivas (especialmente en los tests de inteligencia general y de lectura) con respecto a su nivel de base en comparación con las personas que sólo hablaban una lengua.

3. Las palabras se ven de forma diferente a como lo hacen los monolingües

La gente que habla dos lenguas puede procesar ciertas palabras más rápido, sobre todo si dicha palabra tiene el mismo significado en ambas lenguas, según un estudio de Psychological Science. Gracias a la tecnología de movimiento ocular, los investigadores descubrieron que las personas bilingües pasan menos tiempo observando los llamados “cognados” (palabras de distintos idiomas que comparten la misma raíz morfológica, como por ejemplo, “lune” en francés y “luna” en español), lo que sugiere que su cerebro necesita menos tiempo para procesar la palabra, explicaba Scientific American.

4. No hay inmunidad al Alzheimer, pero sí se desarrolla de forma más tardía

Cualquiera puede padecer Alzheimer, pero las personas bilingües desarrollan esta enfermedad cuatro o cinco años más tarde que las monolingües, de acuerdo con los descubrimientos presentados en el encuentro de 2011 de la American Association for the Advancement of Science. En el estudio participaron 450 pacientes con Alzheimer, la mitad de los cuales habían hablado dos lenguas la mayor parte de sus vidas.

5. Los niños resuelven mejor los problemas

Parece que los niños bilingües realizan mejor las tareas que implican creatividad y capacidad de resolución de problemas, según una investigación publicada en el International Journal of Bilingualism. En el estudio participaron 121 niños, la mitad bilingües, y se les pidió que completaran tareas relacionadas con la repetición de series de números, la resolución mental de problemas matemáticos y la reproducción de patrones con bloques de color, explicaba HealthDay.

6. Su cerebro cambia de tarea con más facilidad

Los niños bilingües pueden ser más rápidos al cambiar de tarea, de acuerdo con un estudio de Child Development. En el estudio, tanto niños bilingües como monolingües tenían que observar imágenes de animales o figuras de colores en una pantalla de ordenador. Cuando a los niños se les pidió que pulsaran un botón para cambiar de las imágenes de animales a las imágenes de colores, los niños bilingües lo hacían más rápido.

7. La capacidad de pensar en otra lengua ayuda a tomar decisiones más razonadas

Cuando la gente piensa en otra lengua tiene más probabilidades de tomar una decisión racional en una situación problemática, según una investigación de 2012 de la revista Psychological Studies. Debido a que las personas, por naturaleza, son reacias a la pérdida, tienden a tomar decisiones que la minimicen, aunque la balanza esté inclinada a su favor. No obstante, investigadores de la Universidad de Chicago descubrieron que cuando la gente piensa en una lengua extranjera, esto les da distancia, lo cual les ayuda a tomar decisiones más deliberadas y menos dependientes de las emociones. “Quizás el factor más importante es que una lengua extranjera tiene menos resonancia emocional que la lengua materna”, comentaba Sayuri Hayakawa, investigadora del estudio. “Una reacción emocional puede conllevar decisiones motivadas por el miedo más que por la esperanza, aunque las probabilidades nos sean muy favorables”.

Fuente:

http://www.huffingtonpost.es/2014/07/01/beneficios-de-aprender-idiomas_n_5514494.html

6 de cada 10 españoles estudian inglés por motivos laborales

El inglés está cada vez más presente entre los españoles, que se preocupan día tras día en hablarlo con la mayor fluidez posible. Ante la actual crisis económica, tener un buen currículum vitae y un nivel alto de inglés se considera esencial para poder conseguir trabajo en un mercado cada vez más competitivo y exigente.

Así lo refleja un amplio estudio realizado por ABA English, academia online especializada en una metodología de aprendizaje única basada en los principios del método natural.

Según datos de la reciente investigación elaborada entre más de dos millones de alumnos, el 59% de los españoles estudia inglés por razones laborales, un porcentaje mayor a la media mundial, situada en un 54%. Cada vez hay más estudiantes que consideran que hablar una lengua extranjera es clave para lograr una carrera profesional más fructífera en un mundo cada vez más globalizado. No obstante, el 17% de los españoles reconoce que cursa inglés por sus inquietudes culturales de aprender un nuevo idioma, mientras que un 14% lo hacen para hablar con mayor fluidez en sus viajes al extranjero y el 10% restante por motivos varios.

Los españoles, muy interesados en aprender inglés

Está a la orden del día el bajo nivel de inglés de los españoles en comparación con muchos otros países de la Unión Europea. Hasta un 18% de las personas que acude a aprender la lengua no cuenta con ningún tipo de formación previa al respecto, mientras que un 40% lo hacen tras haber dado sus primeros pinitos en la escuela. Un 27% asegura haber estudiado ya algún curso en academia o en clases particulares. El 15% restante tiene como experiencia previa búsquedas por Internet, entre otras.

Ante la evidente falta de nivel, los españoles se están poniendo manos a la obra para ser cada vez más competitivos en el mundo laboral. Tanto es así que ABA English ya cuenta con cerca de 350.000 de alumnos (17% en cuanto a porcentaje del estudio se refiere) en este país. Lo mismo ocurre con los italianos (17,2), los brasileños (11,8%) y franceses (10,6%). Otros de los países que lideran este ranking son México (8,2%), Colombia (4,2%) y Canadá (2,9%).

El inglés, un valor añadido para trabajar

Tener un buen nivel de inglés es algo deseado por millones de españoles, conscientes de que se pueden quedar aislados laboralmente si no son capaces de hablar la lengua con fluidez. Las empresas valoran que sus empleados estén tratando de perfeccionar su dominio del inglés. Tanto es así que el 57% de los españoles que estudian inglés se encuentran además trabajando. Un dato que refleja la estrecha relación existente entre trabajar y hablar inglés. El resto de los encuestados están buscando trabajo (23%) o aún estudiando (20%).

¿Cuestión de hombres o de mujeres?

A diferencia que en el pasado, son ya muchas las mujeres que ocupan cargos directivos y de alto nivel. Sus inquietudes por aprender son mayores, incluso para mejorar su formación con el dominio de una lengua extranjera. Según el reciente estudio de ABA English, el 54% de los españoles que cursan inglés son mujeres, mientras que el 46% restante son hombres.

Los más mayores, los nuevos estudiantes

Tenemos la tendencia a pensar que el estudio de inglés está hecho para los más jóvenes. Sin embargo, es cada vez más frecuente ver cómo la gente mayor se interesa por aprender una nueva lengua, ya sea por motivos familiares -como puede ser el caso de querer entender un nuevo idioma para viajar a ver a un hijo que vive en el extranjero- o por la simple razón de enriquecerse culturalmente.

Sea como fuere, lo cierto es que el 15% de los españoles que cursa inglés tienen 55 años o más, mientras que el 23% iguala o supera la barrera de los 45 años. El 27% de los estudiantes de esta lengua extranjera tienen entre 35 y 44 años, un 22% entre 25 y 34 años, mientras que, sorprendentemente, los menores de 25 años sólo representan el 14% del total.

Fuente:

http://ecoaula.eleconomista.es/interstitial/volver/216172702/campus/noticias/6261491/11/14/6-de-cada-10-espanoles-estudian-ingles-por-motivos-laborales.html

Una de cada tres ofertas de trabajo pide saber idiomas y el inglés es el más demandado.

Una de cada tres ofertas de empleo en España requiere conocimientos de, al menos, un idioma, según se recoge en el último informe Infoempleo Adecco del mes de noviembre. Esta tendencia sigue al alza y viene determinada por la actividad laboral que se desarrolla en el puesto de trabajo, los referentes de conocimiento especializado para ese puesto y la nacionalidad de la empresa.

El inglés sigue siendo la lengua más demandada, con el 88,9% de las ofertas. Le sigue (de lejos) el alemán, que se convierte por primera vez en la segunda lengua con el 7,2% de las ofertas, desbancando al francés, que desciende a la tercera posición con el 7,1% de los puestos de trabajo.

Pero, a pesar de que la mayoría de las empresas lo requiere, ¿por qué todavía en España el inglés no se domina correctamente? ¿aprender inglés es realmente complicado para los españoles? ¿cuáles son los motivos de que cause tanta confusión?

1- Familias lingüísticas distintas

El inglés no es una lengua romance, sino que es de origen germánico, por lo que cuenta con sonidos vocálicos que no tenemos. El sistema del español está compuesto por 5 vocales, mientras que en inglés hay más del doble de sonidos vocálicos. Este hecho deja a los españoles más vulnerables que, por ejemplo, los portugueses, ante el inglés. Nuestros vecinos parten con ventaja al contar con un sistema vocálico todavía más complejo que el anglosajón.

2- Traducciones al pie de la letra

El apasionante mundo de las malas traducciones del español al inglés, y viceversa, parece inagotable. Es importante saber que once a day no se traduce como “once veces al día”, o que cuando queremos destacar en inglés que algo “es la leche”, no hay que soltar It’s the milk.

3- Despiste de género

Los ingleses sufren aprendiendo que “moto” es una palabra femenina, o que “planeta” es masculina, a pesar de sus terminaciones. Pero nosotros también nos encontramos con dificultades cuando tratamos de usar en inglés nuestro pronombre “su”, que se acaba desdoblando en his, her o its. Un apunte vital de acordarse si no queremos dar a entender que nuestra novia es un hombre, o que nuestro padre es en realidad una mujer.

4- La ortografía y la pronunciación

El inglés parece carecer de reglas de ortografía y de pronunciación. En castellano, por ejemplo, la “a” siempre se pronuncia “a”, sin complicarnos la vida. En cambio, en el inglés la “a” puede sonar “a”, como en el caso de Apple, o “ey”, como en “ape”. Y si la vocal se combina con otra, la pronunciación se enreda todavía más.

5- Sílaba tónica

Algunas palabras que terminan con el sonido “el” se escriben “-el”, tales como “novel” o “cancel”, pero otras van con “-le” como cable o little. ¿A qué se debía todo esto? Muy sencillo. Las palabras que terminaban en “-el” tenían sílaba tónica aguda, es decir, al final. Pero el idioma ha ido evolucionando y su forma de escribir ya no refleja su pronunciación.

6- Arbitrariedad histórica

Muchos esfuerzos se hicieron en el pasado para estandarizar la forma de escribir el inglés. No obstante, en muchas ocasiones los académicos encargados de ello acabaron creando más caos del necesario.

Por ejemplo, en el siglo XVI decidieron insertar una “b” en las palabras dette (deuda) y doute (duda) para así recordar mejor su raíz latina. Ahora las vemos escritas como debt y doubt, claro que ambas “b” son mudas.

7- Dos son compañía

En castellano los verbos cambian con el sujeto, por lo que no necesitamos mencionarlo. Así, podemos decir tranquilamente “jugó” y entender que se está hablando de la tercera persona del singular. Pero en el inglés es otra historia. Si decimos play podemos estar hablando de él, pero también de nosotros, de ellos… ¡Imposible tenerlo claro! Por ello, en inglés es vital indicar siempre el sujeto si queremos que nos entiendan.

Fuente:

http://www.libremercado.com/2014-12-02/por-que-a-los-espanoles-nos-cuesta-aprender-ingles-1276534972/

9 razones por las que la gente no alcanza la fluidez en inglés

1. “No soy bueno con los idiomas”

Es cierto que algunas personas son mejores aprendiendo idiomas que otras, pero tienes que aceptar que hay gente que simplemente, con o sin un don, lo anhelan más.

En este sentido, el mejor don que puedes tener es REALMENTE QUERER APRENDER. Al menos que tengas algunas deficiencias de aprendizaje serias, estás en perfectas condiciones para aprender inglés. Puede que requiera de más dedicación y paciencia, mejores estrategias, hábitos de estudio y conciencia de tu estilo de aprendizaje; pero decir que lo que te detiene es el hecho de que no eres muy bueno con los idiomas, no es una buena excusa.

La gran mayoría de la gente que ha aprendido a hablar inglés como una segunda lengua no tiene un don., sino que han aprendido a través del trabajo duro y persistente, evitando excusas y superando los obstáculos que todo el mundo afronta.

2. “Me da mucha vergüenza hablar”

Si no lo usas, lo pierdes. La vergüenza o la pereza que impide que hables hará que olvides todo lo que has aprendido hasta ese momento en tu proceso de aprendizaje. Éste es el gran problema que muchos institutos tienen: no crean suficientes oportunidades para hablar en situaciones auténticas.

Si no usas las cosas básicas que aprendes, ningún tipo de gramática avanzada te ayudará a recordar las cosas que has aprendido superficialmente y olvidado por falta de ponerlas en práctica.

Sumado a esto, el hecho de no hablar contribuye a un bloqueo psicológico de todo el proceso de aprendizaje. Así que ¿cuál es el mejor consejo? Abre tu boca. Ya sea en el aula, en la ducha, con amigos que hablan poco o mucho, o con extranjeros en la vida real o por Skype, deja de sentir vergüenza y ABRE TU BOCA.

3. “Los adultos no aprenden idiomas muy bien”

A pesar de que es cierto que un adulto no tiene la misma habilidad que un niño para aprender un idioma extranjero, creo que muchos no nos estamos dando el crédito suficiente. Ser un estudiante adulto tiene muchas ventajas, como por ejemplo: mayor consciencia de nuestro proceso de aprendizaje, el hecho que sabemos lo que queremos, y el hecho que podemos planificar nuestro proceso.

Mientras que es cierto que la mayoría de los estudiantes de idioma adultos nunca perderán completamente su acento, es posible reducirlo usando métodos inteligentes. Sin embargo, si te estás comunicando bien, ¿cuál es el problema con tener un acento? Es quienes somos, de dónde venimos, y una parte importante de nuestra identidad. A veces incluso nos hace sonar sexy y exóticos.

El mundo está lleno de estudiantes de idioma adultos que hacen un excelente trabajo comunicándose y no hay razón por la que no puedes ser uno de ellos.

4. “No tengo tiempo”

No necesitas inscribirte en un instituto de inglés, pagar mucho dinero, o  disponer de varias horas libres por día.

Con tan solo inscribirte y asistir al programa adecuado tendrás mucha ayuda y recibirás una estructura adecuada. Si realmente no tienes tiempo, usa tu imaginación y aprende de la mano de la tecnología en los momentos que más te convenga.

Inglés para la vida es un excelente sitio para comenzar. Allí encontrarás muchos podcasts gratuitos que puedes descargar para aprender mientras, por ejempli, manejas tu auto. Además puedes hacer uso de blogs, videos de Youtube, y muchos otros recursos gratuitos. Si te esfuerzas lo suficiente buscando, encontrarás toneladas de recursos que te ayudarán a aprender inglés sin necesidad de que gastes un centavo.

5.“Necesito ir a un país de habla inglesa”

No necesitas viajar al otro lado del océano para entrar en contacto con el idioma. Hay personas que hablan inglés en todos lados si realmente te tomas el tiempo para buscarlos, y cuando estés en un punto de tu aprendizaje en el que la “inmersión” es algo que te daría un gran impulso, hay otras opciones también.

Puedes encontrar extranjeros en tu ciudad. En Belo Horizonte conozco tres comunidades internacionales: Real Life English, Minas Internacional, y Couch Surfing. Aparte de esto puedes organizar tu vida de forma tal que recibas un constante flujo de inglés nativo, con recursos como podcasts, radios online, programas de televisión, películas, y música.

Lo más importante es hagas del inglés una parte de tu vida. Encuentra la forma para hacerlo divertido.

6. Falta de un propósito claro

Mucha gente no tiene un verdadero PORQUÉ por el cual aprender un idioma. Aun si es cierto que tienes que estudiar inglés por tu profesión, si ésta es la primera cosa que se te viene a la cabeza cuando piensas en el idioma, el proceso de aprendizaje será largo, lento y tedioso. Esto conlleva a la falta de amor por lo que haces y a tener un enfoque mecánico.

Aquellos que aprenden el idioma por motivación externa, generalmente no lo disfrutan. Se aburren y cansan fácilmente y no muy a menudo se dedican a ello.

Entonces, ¿cuál es la solución? Busca un propósito más profundo y cultívalo. Piensa en lo que estás aprendiendo y usa esto como una fuente de inspiración. Aquí encontrarás una inspiradora historia de propósito y perseverancia aplicada al aprendizaje de un idioma.

7. Falta de responsabilidad

Mucha gente pretende pagar para que alguien aprenda inglés por ellos, o adquirir el idioma como si fuera un chip que se inserta en el cerebro. No entienden que para aprender un idioma, uno necesita asumir la responsabilidad que ello implica, y no dejar el aprendizaje en las manos de un profesor, instituto o circunstancias de la vida.

Por supuesto, un instituto o un profesor también tienen sus propias responsabilidades a cumplir, pero el profesor en si es más un facilitador que debe mostrarle al estudiante la puerta al aprendizaje. TÚ eres el que tiene que caminar a través de ella con tu propia fuerza de voluntad.

El inglés no es un chip en tu cerebro, sino un proceso personal en el que debes trabajar todos los días. Sí, TODOS LOS DÍAS. La excelencia (=fluidez) no es algo fácil o rápida. No se obtiene con esfuerzos al azar de dos veces a la semana.

8. Falta de un buen plan/método

Si quieres aprender inglés, necesitas decidirte, clarificar los motivos, investigar bien el camino hacia el éxito, y recién entonces ordenar tu vida y ejecutar. A menudo mucha gente no organiza su vida en torno a un aprendizaje exitoso del inglés porque no tienen un buen plan, no se hacen un tiempo para aprender día a día (afuera del aula), y no investigan qué es lo que hace que un instituto y/o método sea bueno.

La gente busca soluciones rápidas y sencillas a los problemas que tienen que afrontar. Si no tienes éxito aprendiendo inglés, detente y pregúntate a ti mismo “¿por qué quiero aprender?” y asume la responsabilidad de tu propio aprendizaje. Y RECIÉN ENTONCES  puedes comenzar a buscar gente que te pueda ayudar.

Reflexiona acerca de las cosas que he mencionado aquí y luego conversa con tus amigos que han tenido éxito aprendiendo inglés. Pídeles consejos, investiga en internet, visita varias instituciones, observa algunas clases, y aprende a diferenciar lo que es un uso astuto del marketing y lo que es verdadera calidad.

9. Falta de imaginación

La vida y el inglés no son dos cosas separadas cuando usas tu imaginación para aprender. El problema es que la mayoría de la gente trata al inglés como si fuera una materia de la escuela, lo cual es el peor modo para aprender un idioma. A pesar de que estas estrategias pueden (en cierta medida) ayudar, la fluidez en el inglés no se consigue a través de la memorización, gramática o libros de ejercicios.

La fluidez es una danza, un arte, una práctica y una pasión. El estudiante debe relacionar su experiencia de vida con el idioma, para así poder hacer que su imaginación y estilo de estudio fluyan, y para poder dar significado al proceso de aprendizaje. Esto va de la mano con tener un sentido de propósito (#6) porque la imaginación generalmente proviene de un propósito.

Éstos son algunos signos que pueden indicarte que no estás usando tu imaginación: no te diviertes, no tienes ansias por aprender, inventas excusas, y no utilizas tus habilidades naturales.

Entonces, ¿cómo incentivar tu imaginación? Clarifica cuál es el propósito que te lleva a querer aprender y conéctalo con lo que haces y disfrutas, incluyendo tus habilidades naturales, tus intereses, y tu vida. Eso es imaginación.

Qué puedes hacer hoy

Un desafío para ti: tómate 20 minutos para pensar qué es lo que te detiene. Realiza un lluvia de ideas. Anota en un papel un millón de ideas sin filtro alguno. ¿Por qué quieres aprender inglés? ¿En qué eres bueno y cómo puedes aplicar eso al inglés? ¿Cómo puedes cultivar placer por aprender inglés?

No dejes que ninguna excusa te distraiga. Asume la responsabilidad y acepta las respuestas. Piensa acerca de algo que amas hacer e imagina cómo sería si tuvieras la misma pasión por el inglés. Recuerda: “la vida es un viaje, no un destino”. Exactamente lo mismo es tu aprendizaje del inglés. La pregunta del millón es: ¿cómo podrías disfrutar cada paso y al mismo tiempo estar seguro que estás en el buen camino hacia la fluidez? La respuesta solo la sabes tú.

Fuente:

http://reallifeglobal.com/la-fluidez-en-ingles/

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Autumn in New York

Vernon Duke – Autumn in New York (1934)

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Lyrics:

Autumn in New York, why does it seem so inviting?
Autumn in New York, it spells the thrill of first knighting
Glittering crowds and shimmering clouds in canyons of steel
They’re making me feel, I’m home

Its autumn in New York that brings the promise of new love
Autumn in New York is often mingled with pain
Dreamers with empty hands, may sigh for exotic lands
It’s autumn in New York, its good to live it again

Autumn in New York, the gleaming rooftops at sundown
Autumn in New York, it lifts you up when you’re run down
Jaded roués and gay divorcées who lunch at the Ritz
Will tell you that it’s divine

This autumn in New York transforms the slums into Mayfair
Autumn in New York, you’ll need no castle in Spain
Lovers that bless the dark on benches in Central Park
Greet autumn in New York, its good to live it again

Source:

https://silverbirchpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/03/autumn-in-new-york-music-and-lyrics-by-vernon-duke-performed-by-billie-holiday/

 

Fall in Central Park

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Autumn in New York

Autumn in New York, they even wrote a song about it that was a great hit sixty years ago. Last weekend the sky was awash in blue, Manhattan at its best, with Central Park gleaming in green and only the crowds marring the views. New York has changed dramatically these last fifty years, but what city has not? The place has gotten richer, but not better as far as the quality of life is concerned. That ghastly Bloomberg midget sold the place to the highest bidders, so developers are singing his praises, not unlike bootleggers paying homage to Al Capone. Manhattan was always chic in the upper east and west sides, but bohemian and gritty and artistic downtown. No longer. The place has been airbrushed for good, a playground for Indian and Chinese billionaires, Russian molls, Arab crooks, as well as American and European money managers, corporate lawyers and international jetsetters. In other words, the place stinks with new and unacceptable money and manners. Developers are king, long live funny money.

The luxurious downtown loft spaces that used to be cheap artist studios in the Fifties and Sixties, were once failed factories and warehouses during the Forties. Economic and cultural evolution is a constant in many cities, but more so in the city that never sleeps. (In fact, it is impossible to sleep when drilling begins at 7.a.m. and one is a night owl.) Cranes are everywhere, new high rise condos sprout like weeds, a horror to end all horrors stands over Madison Avenue in midtown, like an undulating middle finger to good taste, built by a horrible man called Macklowe that I had the bad luck to go to prep school with. Empty apartments sit by the thousands, owned by zillionaires hedging their bets in case the regimes that enabled them to make their money get their comeuppance. This is no longer the city that Fitzgerald’s exuberant prose romanticized, or Gershwin’s syncopations made us jostle and throb. No siree!

Still, memories of a beautiful woman die hard, and that also goes for cities or towns. Take for example Edward Hopper’s ghostly diner that became an emblem of the city, “Nighthawks.” The painting alludes to the city’s alienation and loneliness, Hopper’s most recognizable work. The location of the diner has never been established, although folklore has it that it was on Greenwich Avenue and 11th Street. Records, however, show that only a gas station was there from the 1930’s through the 1970’s. So where was the most famous diner in the world situated? The mystery was solved some years ago by one Jeremiah Moss, a Manhattan enthusiast, who envisioned the island as a Hopper painting filled with golden, melancholy light. (A bit like the poor little Greek boy.) He discovered an interview in which Hopper himself admitted that there was no such diner, just an all-night coffee shop on Greenwich Avenue that he enlarged and simplified and thus painted the loneliness of a large city. Great stuff.

Well, all that loneliness has gone the way of high button shoes, with bakeries and curved windows and dark bricks that loom in the background all disappearing, all tumbling down to make room for glass office towers and ritzy condos. Thank God the great Hopper is not here to see the destruction. They say that the longer one has lived in Manhattan, the more one loves the vanished city, and no one loved the city more than Hopper or yours truly. And, of course, the great E.B. White, who wrote about the great gift New York bestows, “that of loneliness.”

Luncheonettes, newsstand advertisements for 5-cent cigars, automats, and bakeries aside, what I miss more than all of them put together are the places I used to escape to when school and a foreign language called English got too much: The movie palaces that resembled ocean liners from the outside, with immense pillars triumphantly reaching skywards, and smooth curves like a giant woman’s hips. They have all been torn down and replaced by shopping blocks and superstores selling those machines people look at 24/7. Today’s dreary multiplexes have replaced these wonderful over the top palaces, as today’s ghastly films have replaced those dreams one got excited about as the spectacular interiors went dark.

Oh yes, I almost forgot. What about those dark red brick four story houses that lined the avenues with their wrought iron fire escapes standing guard? So called sophisticates called the fire escapes architectural eyesores, but when was the last time any so called sophisticate got it right? Criminals ruined London in the Sixties and New York in the 2000’s, with their glass boxes and inhuman sizes. Fire escapes were beautiful to look at when I was a child, and I still identify them exclusively with the city’s streetscape. Carnegie Hall has them stretched around the back, and someone once called fire escapes “the urban equivalent of the American front porch.” Hear, hear! Norman Rockwell didn’t do too many of them, he was small town rural, but Hopper did and that’s good enough for me. Lenny Bernstein had Maria singing on a fire escape in West Side Story, and Grace Kelly climbed up one to spy on Raymond Burr in Hitchcock’s Rear Window. Poor people slept on them during the hot nights of August, and Holly Golighty sang Moon River on one. What wouldn’t I give for the glass boxes to disappear and for more fire escaped four story houses to come back? Anything and everything, I’d even forsake a threesome with Keira Knightly and Jessica Raine.

Source:

http://takimag.com/article/autumn_in_new_york/print#axzz3JGQ99NDs

Joan Chen – Autumn in New York (2000)

Script Excerpt:

EXT. CENTRAL PARK — SEPTEMBER AFTERNOON

A COUPLE moves down a walkway, deep in subdued conversation. All around them trees explode with autumn color. Birds sing. Their path is dappled with leafy shadow.

To their left, on the sunny meadow, TEENAGERS throw saucers and footballs, smoke cigarettes and joints, drink beer and soda, savoring the waning hours of summer.

CLOSER ON THE COUPLE

He is WILLS KEANE, late 40’s to early 50’s, strikingly handsome, impeccably dressed, and supremely poised. At first glance he has the proud glow of a hedonist who in the war against time has been the undisputed victor.

Only a closer look hints at the toll of battle. His shoulders strain under the weight of so much repetition. His eyes are touched by regret. The lines in his face reveal an emerging disenchantment not so much with the world as with himself.

Walking at his side is a WOMAN, 30, attractive and bright. Her name is unimportant because so many have come before her and, if the past prevails, so many will come after.

She listens intently, as Wills finishes speaking —

WILLS

— and I could have waited to tell you, but I wanted to leave no room for misunderstanding.

WOMAN

Well, you certainly didn’t.

EXT. ANOTHER CENTRAL PARK WALKWAY — LATER

Still talking quietly, they pass into a more secluded area of the park–

WOMAN

No, I see how you could feel this way. Of course I do. It’s human. But what I don’t get is why you’d want to announce it so quickly. I mean, we just met. Feelings change. You don’t even know me.

WILLS

Yes, I do. She is amused by his confidence —

WOMAN

Oh, really?

WILLS

The minute I laid eyes on you. It’s the saddest thing about getting older. You know people so quickly. I even knew you’d end up hating me.

WOMAN

Well, you’re wrong. I don’t.

WILLS

(with a weary smile) Give it time.

She laughs. Then he stops. He hears something. She stops. She hears it, too. It’s a GIRL’S VOICE. He casually turns and looks, squinting into the sun.

He takes a few steps and there, between trees, he sees TWO DOZEN PEOPLE sitting on the grass and on folding chairs — most are middle-aged or older with a distinctly intellectual- bohemian look to them.

Standing and addressing them is CHARLOTTE FIELDING, 19, fair, willowy, pale, lovely in an unconventional way. She wears an eccentric hat and a vintage dress. Her bearing is upright, her gaze warm and intelligent, her voice rich with emotion —

CHARLOTTE

— and for weeks I sat by her bed and cried. I told her I loved her and I begged her not to leave me. All I could think about was what I’d lose if she died. And then one night… she was in really bad pain… I stopped thinking about myself for a second and I thought about her. (fighting tears) I stopped crying. I said goodbye. And in less than an hour Ella was gone.

The woman whispers in Wills’ ear —

WOMAN

It’s so sad.

But Wills ignores her. He watches Charlotte with keen interest, touched by the depth and sincerity of her emotion.

CHARLOTTE

I really think it’s possible to hold a person back… cry them back… from dying. That’s what I did to Ella and I’ll never do it to anyone else again. (softly) I hope no one ever does it to me.

She looks out at the group, many of whom are crying. A tear runs down her cheek. She smiles and wipes it away.

The woman, seeing Wills’ interest in the girl, whispers —

WOMAN

So what do you know about her? He knows a great deal. Or at least he thinks he does. But his answer is nonchalant —

WILLS

That she’s just a kid.

He takes the woman gently by the elbow and guides her away. He steals one last look back.

Charlotte, returning to where she was sitting, notices Wills. Their eyes meet and a charge passes between them.

Meanwhile an OLD MAN has risen from his chair —

OLD MAN

I met Ella at City College in 1938… Wills slowly turns and walks away.

Read more:

http://www.imsdb.com/scripts/Autumn-in-New-York.html

Video:

Vernon Duke – Autumn in New York Versions

Frank Sinatra (1947)

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Billie Holiday (1952)

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Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Amstrong (1957)

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Jimmy Roselli (1965)

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Bing Crosby (1977)

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Rosemary Clooney (1991)

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Ann Crumb (2001)

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Sheila Jordan (2012)

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Yaala Ballin (2012)

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Autumn Leaves

when_autumn_leaves_start_to_fall_by_luizalazar-d5egmsd

Autumn Leaves (Originally “Les Feuilles Mortes” by Joseph Kosma & Jacques Prévert, 1945)

The falling leaves
Drift by the window
The autumn leaves
All red and gold
I see your lips
The summer kisses
The sunburned hands
I used to hold.

Since you went away
The days grow long…
And soon I’ll hear
Old winter songs
But I miss you most of all
My darling, when autumn leaves start to fall…

C’est une chanson
Qui nous ressemble
Toi qui m’aimais
Et je t’aimais
Nous vivions tous les deux ensemble
Toi qui m’aimais
Moi qui t’aimais

Mais la vie sépare
Ceux qui s’aiment
Tout doucement
Sans faire de bruit
Et la mer efface sur le sable
Les pas des amants désunis.

Since you went away
The days grow long…
And soon I’ll hear
Old winter songs
But I miss you most of all
My darling, when autumn leaves start to fall…

Source:

http://lyricstranslate.com/en/Edith-Piaf-Autumn-Leaves-lyrics.html

Yves Montand – Les Portes de la Nuit (1946)

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Edith Piaf (1950)

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Nat King Cole (1956)

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Robert Aldrich – Autumn Leaves (Movie, 1956)

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http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/278126/Autumn-Leaves-Movie-Clip-Mind-If-I-Join-You-.html

Frank Sinatra (1956)

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Jerry Lee Lewis (1971)

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Eva Cassidy (1996)

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Andrea Bocelli (2006)

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Iggy Pop (2009)

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Eric Clapton (2010)

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Victor Mendoza (2011)

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Jermaine Jackson & David Serero (2013)

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The Origins of the English Language

English language ‘originated in Turkey’

Modern Indo-European languages – which include English – originated in Turkey about 9,000 years ago, researchers say. Their findings differ from conventional theory that these languages originated 5,000 years ago in south-west Russia. The New Zealand researchers used methods developed to study virus epidemics to create family trees of ancient and modern Indo-European tongues to pinpoint where and when the language family first arose.

A language family is a group of languages that arose from a common ancestor, known as the proto-language. Linguists identify these families by trawling through modern languages for words of similar sound that often describe the same thing, like water and wasser (German). These shared words – or cognates – represent our language inheritance. According to the Ethnologue database, more than 100 language families exist.

The Indo-European family is one of the largest families – more than 400 languages spoken in at least 60 countries – and its origins are unclear. The Steppes, or Kurgan, theorists hold that the proto-language originated in the Steppes of Russia, north of the Caspian Sea, about 5,000 years ago. The Anatolia hypothesis – first proposed in the late 1980s by Prof Colin Renfrew (now Lord Renfrew) – suggests an origin in the Anatolian region of Turkey about 3,000 years earlier.

To determine which competing theory was the most likely, Dr Quentin Atkinson from the University of Auckland and his team interrogated language evolution using phylogenetic analyses – more usually used to trace virus epidemics.

Fundamentals of life

Phylogenetics reveals relatedness by assessing how much of the information stored in DNA is shared between organisms. Chimpanzees and humans have a common ancestor and share about 98% of their DNA. Because of this shared ancestry, they cluster together on phylogenetic – or family – trees. Like DNA, language is passed down, generation to generation.

Although language changes and evolves, some linguists have argued that cognates describing the fundamentals of life – kinship (mother, father), body parts (eye, hand), the natural world (fire, water) and basic verbs (to walk, to run) – resist change. These conserved cognates are strongly linked to the proto-language of old.

Dr Atkinson and his team built a database containing 207 cognate words present in 103 Indo‐European languages, which included 20 ancient tongues such as Latin and Greek. Using phylogenetic analysis, they were able to reconstruct the evolutionary relatedness of these modern and ancient languages – the more words that are cognate, the more similar the languages are and the closer they group on the tree. The trees could also predict when and where the ancestral language originated. Looking back into the depths of the tree, Dr Atkinson and his colleagues were able to confirm the Anatolian origin.

To test if the alternative hypothesis – of a Russian origin several thousand years later – was possible, the team used competing models of evolution to pitch Steppes and Anatolian theory against each other. In repeated tests, the Anatolian theory always came out on top.

Commenting on the paper, Prof Mark Pagel, a Fellow of the Royal Society from the University of Reading who was involved in earlier published phylogenetic studies, said: “This is a superb application of methods taken from evolutionary biology to understand a problem in cultural evolution – the origin and expansion of the Indo-European languages. “This paper conclusively shows that the Indo-European languages are at least 8-9,500 years old, and arose, as has long been speculated, in the Anatolian region of what is modern-day Turkey and spread outwards from there.” Commenting on the inclusion of ancient languages in the analyses, he added: “The use of a number of known calibration points from ‘fossil’ languages greatly strengthens the conclusions.”

However, the findings have not found universal acceptance. Prof Petri Kallio from the University of Helsinki suggests that several cognate words describing technological inventions – such as the wheel – are evident across different languages. He argues that the Indo-European proto-language diversified after the invention of the wheel, about 5,000 years ago.

On the phylogenetic methods used to date the proto-language, Prof Kallio added: “So why do I still remain sceptical? Unlike archaeological radiocarbon dating based on the fixed rate of decay of the carbon-14 isotope, there is simply no fixed rate of decay of basic vocabulary, which would allow us to date ancestral proto-languages. “Instead of the quantity of the words, therefore, the trained Indo-Europeanists concentrate on the quality of the words.” Prof Pagel is less convinced by the counter-argument: “Compared to the Kurgan hypothesis, this new analysis shows the Anatolian hypothesis as the clear winner.”

Source:

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-19368988

 

‘Oldest English words’

Some of the oldest words in English have been identified, scientists say. Reading University researchers claim “I”, “we”, “two” and “three” are among the most ancient, dating back tens of thousands of years. Their computer model analyses the rate of change of words in English and the languages that share a common heritage. The team says it can predict which words are likely to become extinct – citing “squeeze”, “guts”, “stick” and “bad” as probable first casualties.

“We use a computer to fit a range of models that tell us how rapidly these words evolve,” said Mark Pagel, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Reading. “We fit a wide range, so there’s a lot of computation involved; and that range then brackets what the true answer is and we can estimate the rates at which these things are replaced through time.”

Sound and concept

Across the Indo-European languages – which include most of the languages spoken from Europe to the Asian subcontinent – the vocal sound made to express a given concept can be similar. New spoken words for a concept can arise in a given language, utilising different sounds, in turn giving a clue to a word’s relative age in the language.

At the root of the Reading University effort is a lexicon of 200 words that is not specific to culture or technology, and is therefore likely to represent concepts that have not changed across nations or millennia. “We have lists of words that linguists have produced for us that tell us if two words in related languages actually derive from a common ancestral word,” said Professor Pagel. “We have descriptions of the ways we think words change and their ability to change into other words, and those descriptions can be turned into a mathematical language,” he added.

The researchers used the university’s IBM supercomputer to track the known relations between words, in order to develop estimates of how long ago a given ancestral word diverged in two different languages. They have integrated that into an algorithm that will produce a list of words relevant to a given date. “You type in a date in the past or in the future and it will give you a list of words that would have changed going back in time or will change going into the future,” Professor Pagel told BBC News. “From that list you can derive a phrasebook of words you could use if you tried to show up and talk to, for example, William the Conqueror.”

That is, the model provides a list of words that are unlikely to have changed from their common ancestral root by the time of William the Conqueror. Words that have not diverged since then would comprise similar sounds to their modern descendants, whose meanings would therefore probably be recognisable on sound alone. However, the model cannot offer a guess as to what the ancestral words were. It can only estimate the likelihood that the sound from a modern English word might make some sense if called out during the Battle of Hastings.

Dirty business

What the researchers found was that the frequency with which a word is used relates to how slowly it changes through time, so that the most common words tend to be the oldest ones. For example, the words “I” and “who” are among the oldest, along with the words “two”, “three”, and “five”. The word “one” is only slightly younger. The word “four” experienced a linguistic evolutionary leap that makes it significantly younger in English and different from other Indo-European languages.

Meanwhile, the fastest-changing words are projected to die out and be replaced by other words much sooner. For example, “dirty” is a rapidly changing word; currently there are 46 different ways of saying it in the Indo-European languages, all words that are unrelated to each other. As a result, it is likely to die out soon in English, along with “stick” and “guts”. Verbs also tend to change quite quickly, so “push”, “turn”, “wipe” and “stab” appear to be heading for the lexicographer’s chopping block. Again, the model cannot predict what words may change to; those linguistic changes are according to Professor Pagel “anybody’s guess”.

High fidelity

“We think some of these words are as ancient as 40,000 years old. The sound used to make those words would have been used by all speakers of the Indo-European languages throughout history,” Professor Pagel said. “Here’s a sound that has been connected to a meaning – and it’s a mostly arbitrary connection – yet that sound has persisted for those tens of thousands of years.”

The work casts an interesting light on the connection between concepts and language in the human brain, and provides an insight into the evolution of a dynamic set of words. “If you’ve ever played ‘Chinese whispers’, what comes out the end is usually gibberish, and more or less when we speak to each other we’re playing this massive game of Chinese whispers. Yet our language can somehow retain its fidelity.”

Source:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7911645.stm

Multimedia:

http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/interactives/languages/words/timeline/

Series of Podcast:

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/07/31/episode-1-introduction/

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/04/episode-2-the-indo-european-discovery-5/

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/04/episode-3-the-indo-european-family-tree-4/

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/05/episode-9-who-were-the-indo-europeans-2/

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/05/episode-10-early-indo-european-migrations-2/

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/05/episode-11-germanic-ancestors-2/

Series of Animation:

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/languages/english-language/the-history-english-ten-minutes?track=1

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/languages/english-language/the-history-english-ten-minutes?track=2

Video:

http://film.britishcouncil.org/history-of-the-english-language

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